Dr. Cedric Joseph Oliva 

Intercomprehension, Romance Linguistics, Teaching Methodology  

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Donato, Clorinda et Cedric Joseph Oliva. 2016. The Future Is Multilingual: French, Italian, and Portuguese for Spanish Speakers. ADFL Bulletin Vol. 44, No. 1. pp. 112-127.

The authors discuss the stakes of multilingualism through the lens an achievable goal for language students in America. They specifically look at the case of bilingual learners who speak English and Spanish in their process of acquiring a third  language or fourth language and how their previous knowledge of two languages ability to cross-reference and multiculturalism influenced their third language acquisition.



Oliva, Cedric Joseph; Clorinda Donato; et al. 2014. Redshelf CSU. (79p.)

Juntos: Italian for Speakers of English and Spanish, is an e-book that facilitates the acquisition of the Italian language for students who know Spanish as heritage speakers, native speakers, or as learners of Spanish in high school or college. Designed for use in tandem with any firstyear Italian language textbook, Juntos offers learners and instructors a comparative view of Italian, Spanish, and English. Charts, explanations, and exercises train students to focus their attention on the similarities among Italian, Spanish, English, as well as the differences. This process of language noticing equips students with a set of tools that they can use for linguistic exploration and the inclusion of Italian into their own personal language repertoire. Coupled with communicative approach textbooks, Juntos enables multilingual students to take advantage of their preexisting linguistic skills to speak better and faster. With salient examples offered in other Romance languages as well, Juntos fosters Intercomprehension, i.e., the ability to read and understand languages belonging to the same language family. Enhancing oral fluency while providing a solid foundation in reading, writing and listening, Juntos is the ideal solution for multilingual students of Italian.

Oliva, Cedric Joseph and Clorinda Donato. 2015. Nouveau public, nouvelle stratégie: Français pour locuteurs anglo-hispanophones. Didactique du FLE

à réinventer: mondialisation, immigration et référents culturels en coportage.

Crisolenguas 3:1. (p.58-71)


Qui est le public estudiantin dans l’enseignement du Français aux États-Unis? Une large et grandissante communauté d’élèves et d’étudiants bilingues, d’héritage ou d’apprentissage, ces jeunes américains bilingues qui parlent espagnol, s’attendent à recevoir un enseignement approprié à leurs connaissances pré-acquises. Cet article décrit ce public, discute de certaines des stratégies implémentées et finalement démontre ce que nous avons accomplis dans le développement d’un cursus approprié, pour ces étudiants qui avec l’avantage de connaitre une langue romane ; mais également l’avantage de savoir déchiffrer, au travers de leur bilinguisme, dans leurs langues anglaise les clefs franco-romanes, ces deux facultés étant un facteur facilitant leur apprentissage d’une tierce langue romane : le français dans ce cas. Le tout s’inscrivant dans l’optique d’une didactique du FLE à réinventer.


Donato, Clorinda and Cedric Joseph Oliva. 2015. The ties that bind: Italian for Spanish Speakers in Intercomprehension. Intercomprehension and Plurilingualism: Assets for Italian Language in the USA.  Transaction 3:0,  J.D. Calandra Italian American Institute. (p.61-78)


The philosophy of second language acquisition in the United States is quietly undergoing a potentially radical transition from belief in monolingual, mono-directional acquisition patterns to multilingual, multidirectional learning models that correspond far more closely to the language realities of transnational subjects whose blended identities are lived, experienced and/or expressed in more than one language. [...]


Donato, Clorinda; Cedric Joseph Oliva; et al. 2014. Redshelf CSU. (81p.)

Juntos: Italian for Speakers of English and Spanish, is an e-book that facilitates the acquisition of the Italian language for students who know Spanish as heritage speakers, native speakers, or as learners of Spanish in high school or college. Designed for use in tandem with any firstyear Italian language textbook, Juntos offers learners and instructors a comparative view of Italian, Spanish, and English. Charts, explanations, and exercises train students to focus their attention on the similarities among Italian, Spanish, English, as well as the differences. This process of language noticing equips students with a set of tools that they can use for linguistic exploration and the inclusion of Italian into their own personal language repertoire. Coupled with communicative approach textbooks, Juntos enables multilingual students to take advantage of their preexisting linguistic skills to speak better and faster. With salient examples offered in other Romance languages as well, Juntos fosters Intercomprehension, i.e., the ability to read and understand languages belonging to the same language family. Enhancing oral fluency while providing a solid foundation in reading, writing and listening, Juntos is the ideal solution for multilingual students of Italian.

Jaffe, Alexandra and Cedric Joseph Oliva. 2013. Linguistic creativity in Corsican tourist context. Multilingualism and the periphery. New York: Oxford university press. (p.95-117)


Multilingualism and the Periphery is an edited volume that explores the ways in which core-periphery dynamics shape multilingualism. The research focuses on peripheral sites, which are defined by a relationship - be it geographic, political, economic etc. - to some perceived centre. Viewing multilingualism through the lens of core-periphery dynamics allows the contributors to highlight language ideological tensions with regard to language boundary-making, language ownership, commodification and authenticity, as well as the ways in which speakers seek novel solutions in adapting their linguistic resources to new situations and thereby develop innovative language practices.


Oliva, Cedric Joseph. 2012. (Dis)Unity: The Italian Influences on Corsican Linguistic and Cultural Developments. Carte Italiane 2:8 , Department of Italian at UCLA(p.71-92)

The island of Corsica was  considered to be affiliated on multiple levels (linguistic, geographical, ethnical, historical, etc.) to the pre-unified Italian world until when it was ceded to France by the Genoese Republic in 1768. This separation occurred about a century before the formal Italian unification. The island continued to evolve with and within the Italian world until the language transition from Italian to French was fully completed which did not happen until the early 20th century. 

As a result, on the one hand, the islanders oscillate between the original contiguity of their culture and a remaining  ability to intercommunicate; on the other hand, over the years of separation their evolution took different paths, which resulted in the rupture of the linguistic and cultural continua with Italy. Even though many antagonisms developed after a century of majorly Gallicized linguistic and cultural influence which resulted in the development of Corsicaness and was fulfilled by the acceptance of Corsican as a language, Corsica retains undeniably visible links and similarities with the peninsula.

In this article, I discuss the effects of a (dis)unity that reaches outside of the Italian borders. The historical evolution and disruption of the linguistic and cultural continua on Corsica, set a frame of reference for the conceptualization of the links that currently unite and separate Corsica and Italy. This leads to highlighting aspects of the contemporary social, cultural and linguistic relationships, or lack of relationships, between the island and the peninsula. I propose to look at the Italian influences on Corsica it on an attempt to define the level of “italianess” of the islanders in a sociolinguistic and socio-cultural approach to near languages and near cultures, in order to define Corsica’s ‘Disunity’ from and ‘Unity’ with Italy.